Document Type

Other

Publication Date

8-12-1998

Abstract

Multimedia applications have the potential to enhance work for teams of users collaborating across distances Jitter hampers the effectiveness of these multimedia applications Jitter is the variation in the end-to-end delay of data sent from one user to another Jitter can cause silent gaps in the playout of an audio stream such as in an audioconference or a choppy appearance to a video stream for a videoconference We experimentally measure the effects of three jitter reduction techniques high-performance processors real-time priorities and high-speed networks We incorporate our jitter measurements into a general model for multimedia application quality Our model allows us to explore how advances in networks and processors will improve application quality compared with real-time priorities As an example we apply our model to a videoconference We find high-performance processors real-time priorities and high-speed networks all significantly reduce jitter under conditions of heavy processor and network load For the next five years processor and network improvements alone will not reduce jitter enough to eliminate the need for application buffering techniques However for multimedia on a LAN real-time priorities can reduce jitter enough to eliminate the need for application buffering today On a WAN especially the Internet real-time priorities may not be available on all routers reducing the effectiveness of real-time priorities in reducing jitter In this case buffering techniques may still be needed

DOI

WPI-CS-TR-98-19

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