Identifier

etd-121212-164128

Abstract

"Vehicular Dynamic Spectrum Access (VDSA) combines the advantages of dynamic spectrum access to achieve higher spectrum efficiency and the special mobility pattern of vehicle fleets. This dissertation presents several noval contributions with respect to vehicular communications, especially vehicle-to-vehicle communications. Starting from a system engineering aspect, this dissertation will present several promising future directions for vehicle communications, taking into consideration both the theoretical and practical aspects of wireless communication deployment. This dissertation starts with presenting a feasibility analysis using queueing theory to model and estimate the performance of VDSA within a TV whitespace environment. The analytical tool uses spectrum measurement data and vehicle density to find upper bounds of several performance metrics for a VDSA scenario in TVWS. Then, a framework for optimizing VDSA via artificial intelligence and learning, as well as simulation testbeds that reflect realistic spectrum sharing scenarios between vehicle networks and heterogeneous wireless networks including wireless local area networks and wireless regional area networks. Detailed experimental results justify the testbed for emulating a mobile dynamic spectrum access environment composed of heterogeneous networks with four dimensional mutual interference. Vehicular cooperative communication is the other proposed technique that combines the cooperative communication technology and vehicle platooning, an emerging concept that is expected to both increase highway utilization and enhance both driver experience and safety. This dissertation will focus on the coexistence of multiple vehicle groups in shared spectrum, where intra-group cooperation and inter-group competition are investigated in the aspect of channel access. Finally, a testbed implementation VDSA is presented and a few applications are developed within a VDSA environment, demonstrating the feasibility and benefits of some features in a future transportation system."

Publisher

Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Degree Name

PhD

Department

Electrical & Computer Engineering

Project Type

Dissertation

Date Accepted

2012-12-12

Accessibility

Unrestricted

Subjects

Automobile Networks, Cognitive Radio, Dynamic Spectrum Access, Vehicular

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