Faculty Advisor or Committee Member

Christopher A. Brown, Advisor

Faculty Advisor or Committee Member

Richard D. Sisson, Jr., Department Head

Faculty Advisor or Committee Member

Michael A. Gennert, Committee Member

Faculty Advisor or Committee Member

Walter T. Towner, Committee Member

Faculty Advisor or Committee Member

Mei Yang, Committee Member

Identifier

etd-071119-101711

Abstract

Surfaces cover everything, and since the first standards for the measurement and characterization of surface texture were written researchers, scientists, and engineers have known that all surfaces have a directional property. This property is either an alignment of features or roughness on the surface (anisotropy), a lack of such an alignment (isotropy), or in most cases something in between. In the earliest standards written, this anisotropy of surfaces was characterized visually and referred to as “Lay.” This lay is almost always caused by the process that created the surface of question and can have significant impact on the surfaces performance when interacting with other surfaces in cases where fluids or partials are flowing over the surface. By the late 1900s researchers began to quantify surface anisotropy and by the year 2000 it had been established that surface anisotropy is a multi-scale phenomenon. In this work I look at and expand the state of the art in the characterization of surface anisotropy with examples from both biological and engineering surfaces.

Publisher

Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Degree Name

PhD

Department

Manufacturing Engineering

Project Type

Dissertation

Date Accepted

2019-04-17

Accessibility

Unrestricted

Subjects

Anisotropy, Roughness, Surface

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