Faculty Advisor

Ki Chon

Faculty Advisor

Patrick Flaherty

Faculty Advisor

Yitzhak Mendelson

Identifier

etd-020216-143640

Abstract

Pulse oximetry is used to measure heart rate (HR) and arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) from photoplethysmographic (PPG) waveforms. PPG waveforms are highly sensitive to motion artifact (MA), limiting the implementation of pulse oximetry in mobile physiological monitoring using wearable devices. Previous studies have shown that multichannel pulse oximetry can successfully acquire diverse signal information during simple, repetitive motion, thus leading to differences in motion tolerance across channels. In this study, we introduce a multichannel forehead-mounted pulse oximeter and investigate the performance of this novel sensor under a variety of intense motion artifacts. We have developed a multichannel template-matching algorithm that chooses the channel with the least amount of motion artifact to calculate HR and SpO2 every 2 seconds. We show that for a wide variety of random motion, channels respond differently to motion, and the multichannel estimate outperforms single channel estimates in terms of motion tolerance, signal quality, and HR and SpO2 error. Based on 31 data sets of PPG waveforms corrupted by random motion, the mean relative HR error was decreased by an average of 5.6 bpm when the multichannel-switching algorithm was compared to the worst performing channel. The percentage of HR measurements with absolute errors ≤ 5 bpm during motion increased by an average of 27.8 % when the multichannel-switching algorithm was compared to the worst performing channel. Similarly, the mean relative SpO2 error was decreased by an average of 4.3 % during motion when the multichannel-switching algorithm was compared to each individual channel. The percentage of SpO2 measurements with absolute error ≤ 3 % during motion increased by an average of 40.7 % when the multichannel-switching algorithm was compared to the worst performing channel. Implementation of this multichannel algorithm in a wearable device will decrease dropouts in HR and SpO2 measurements during motion. Additionally, the differences in motion frequency introduced across channels observed in this study shows precedence for future multichannel-based algorithms that make pulse oximetry measurements more robust during a greater variety of intense motion.

Publisher

Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Degree Name

MS

Department

Biomedical Engineering

Project Type

Thesis

Date Accepted

2016-02-02

Accessibility

Restricted-WPI community only

Subjects

Arterial Oxygen Saturation, Heart Rate, Multichannel Pulse Oximetry, Pulse Oximetry, Multichannel Template-Matching, Motion Artifacts

Available for download on Saturday, February 02, 2019

Share

COinS