Faculty Advisor or Committee Member

Aaron Sakulich, Advisor

Faculty Advisor or Committee Member

Rajib Mallick, Committee Member

Faculty Advisor or Committee Member

Leonard Albano, Committee Member

Faculty Advisor or Committee Member

Amy Peterson, Committee Member

Identifier

etd-042018-092631

Abstract

Epoxy coatings are currently the most popular corrosion protection mechanism for steel reinforcement in structural concrete. However, these coatings are easily damaged on worksites, negating their intended purpose. This study investigates self-healing coatings for steel reinforcement to introduce an autonomous healing mechanism for damaged coatings. Coatings were applied to steel coupons, intentionally damaged, and introduced to a corrosive environment via aerated salt-water tanks. Performance of the experimental coatings was evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively. Adhesion strength and effects of coating thickness were also studied. Results from coated steel coupons subjected to damage and submerged in salt-water aeration tanks exhibited improved corrosion resistance performance with self-healing coatings. However, self-healing coatings have comparable poor adhesion to the substrate as do conventional coatings. This paper shows preliminary results demonstrating the potential benefits of self-healing coatings for steel reinforcement and identifies numerous avenues for future research.

Publisher

Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Degree Name

MS

Department

Civil & Environmental Engineering

Project Type

Thesis

Date Accepted

2018-04-20

Accessibility

Unrestricted

Subjects

epoxy, corrosion, steel reinforcement, self-healing coatings

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