Faculty Advisor

Camesano, Terri Anne

Abstract

Bacterial infections from contaminated food and medical devices are a common occurrence. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) effectively kill bacteria in solution. Peptides immobilized to a surface with a flexible spacer molecule, such as SM(PEG)12, may allow the peptides to retain their antibacterial properties, potentially helping to prevent these bacterial infections. This study focused on determining the ability of immobilized Chrysophsin-1, an AMP, to kill S. aureus, a gram-positive bacterium. QCM-D was used to characterize peptide and bacterial adsorption to a SiO2 surface. Results showed that Chrysophsin-1 bound via an SM(PEG)12 spacer molecule were not as effective at killing S. aureus when compared to peptide that was physically adsorbed to the surface.

Publisher

Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Date Accepted

April 2013

Major

Chemical Engineering

Project Type

Major Qualifying Project

Accessibility

Unrestricted

Advisor Department

Chemical Engineering

Share

COinS