Faculty Advisor

Cocola, James

Abstract

United by commitments to Native peoples, Peter Jones and William Apess advocated for recognition of rights, increased respect, and self-determination for North America’s indigenous populations in the mid 19th century. Similar discussions of key topics—including racial equality before God, the injustice of colonization, Christian hypocrisy, and the introduction of alcohol by whites—highlight shared ideological foundations and mutual dedication to the cause of survivance. The disparity between their public approaches derives not from fundamental disagreements in outlook, but instead from the differing demands of vastly dissimilar national and regional contexts. Although he initially appears conciliatory and assimilated, Jones was driven by the same ethos that guided his Pequot counterpart.

Publisher

Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Date Accepted

April 2014

Major

Humanities and Arts

Project Type

Major Qualifying Project

Accessibility

Unrestricted

Advisor Department

Humanities and Arts

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